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Edoardo Cefala, School of Economics

I am a PhD student in the School of Economics at The University of Nottingham. My research interest focuses on the economic and cultural effects of globalisation and the subsequent surge of populist and extremist parties in Western Democracies.


Esmeralda Bon, School of Politics and International Relations

Esmeralda Bon is a doctoral student in the School of Politics and International Relations. She is carrying out research into Public Opinion on Standards in Public Life: Dynamics, Causes and Consequences.


Jose Carrillo Viramontes, School of Economics

I am a first year PhD student in Economics at The University of Nottingham. Currently, I am working in the effects of geographic localization on incumbents’ behaviour, under yardstick competition approach. Specifically, I am interested in analysing the differences between incumbents localized in central regions, and those localized in peripheral regions. Moreover, the probability of setting the correct tax policy can be different when the geographic localization of a region is taken into account via yardstick competition.


Roel Dom, School of Economics

Roel Dom focuses his research on the political economy of tax policy and administration reform in East Africa. He is particularly interested in the effects of the policy making process on the stability and resilience of tax revenues as well as on the incentives for private sector development. His doctoral research is jointly supervised by the Schools of Economics and Politics and is funded by the ESRC in collaboration with the Overseas Development Institute (ODI).


Hong Hieu Huynh, School of Politics and International Relations

I hold my Bachelor in Finance and Banking of University of Economics and Law-Vietnam National University in 2007 and my Master degree in Public Administration of Northumbria University – Newcastle upon Tyne, the UK in 2009. From 2010 to 2014, I was a lecturer in Faculty of Economics – University of Economics and Law – Vietnam National University. Currently, I am a PhD student in the School of Politics and Relations and I am a member of the Nottingham Interdisciplinary Centre for Economic and Political Research and the Centre for British Politics.


Suyani Indriastuti, School of Politics and International Relations

My research topic is ‘Foreign Direct Investment and Human Security: A Case Study of Impacts of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Mining on Human Security of Local Community in Indonesia’. This thesis is started by an inquiry that the existence of FDI should increase people’s welfare. However, in the case of FDI on mining, there are many problems related to people living around the mining area which might result from political and economic relations between state and corporations. It makes people face human insecurity. The research will compare two regions which operate FDI in mining but their welfares are quite contrasted.


Tom Lane, School of Economics

I am a PhD student in the School of Economics. My research concerns intergroup discrimination. I have conducted a meta-analysis of laboratory experiments measuring discrimination, and am now running my own experiments to explain the results. I am interested in social norms, and how these vary across cultures. More generally, my interests include individual and group decision-making processes. My research is funded by the Network for Integrated Behavioural Science.


Ly Le, School of Politics and International Relations

I am currently a doctoral researcher at the School of Politics and International Relations. I earned my first B.A. in English and second Bachelor’s degree in International Economics from the University of Languages and International Studies (ULIS) and University of Economics and Business, Hanoi National University. In 2014, I was awarded an M.A degree in Development Economics at the National Economics University. After working as a reporter for Vietnam Economic Times, I have been a lecturer of English for Communication and Special Purposes at the ULIS. My research’s focus is on American Public Diplomacy towards the Southeast Asia.


Dishil Shrimankar, School of Politics and International Relations

Through my research, I wish to explain the reasons for the differences in the party systems found at the sub-national level in India. Studies have often focused on explaining the ‘national’ picture of party system in India. Considering the diversity of India, which is almost analogous to the European Union, it seems very surprising to see a void in a systematic study of the party systems within India. Using a comparative historical analysis, I wish to investigate the causes for the differences in the party systems found at the sub-national level in India. Particularly, I am interested in the party systems of two states in western India; Gujarat and Maharashtra.


Chris Stafford

I am a first year PhD student within the School of Politics and International Relations. My research is currently focused on how differences between ‘elite’ and public opinion, with regards to the European Union, can affect policy positions and how such differences in opinion are reconciled, if at all. My other interests include electoral reform, British and Canadian politics and the history of economic thought.


Fanni Toth, School of Politics and International Relations

Fanni Toth is an ESRC-funded doctoral researcher, holding a BA Hons in European Politics and two MA degrees in Diplomacy and International Relations (Research Track). Fanni is writing an article-based thesis focusing on European integration and its effects on individual attitudes and perceptions. Her research comprises both quantitative methods of mass survey analysis, as well as qualitative methods of elite interviews with diplomats working in Brussels. The aim of the thesis is to explore the effect that interaction with the EU can have on the perceptions and attitudes of individuals, both at the elite and the mass (citizen) level.


Zhixian Yu, School of Economics

Before joining The University of Nottingham, where I am currently enrolled in the Economics PhD programme, I received my Bachelor degree in Economics from Nanjing University, and Master degrees from UCL and TSE. I am mainly interested in theoretical microeconomic theory and my recent research interests lie in the inefficiency of bilateral negotiations. In particular, in my work I explain the emergence of a U-shaped settlement pattern phenomenon in negotiations with endogenous commitment.


Junyan Zhu, School of Politics and International Relations

I am a doctoral student at the School of Politics and International Relations.  My research fields encompass political communication and political methodology, with an emphasis on political behaviour and attitudes. More specifically, I study political participation, public opinion, campaigns, and elections.  My current research examines the effect of Internet usage on political interest, political efficacy, and political knowledge.  In my thesis, I try to explain the Internet’s impact on civic engagement and explore how to improve citizenship by encouraging effective political participation and stimulating informed electoral choice.