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Working papers

NICEP Working Paper Series

The aim of the NICEP Working Paper Series is to serve as a platform to present the work in progress of NICEP members and associates/speakers and to encourage debate and discussion on our research. You are invited to email the authors of the working papers with comments and/or suggestions.

NICEP working papers are freely available online to all and downloadable in pdf format.

2016-01: Does Material Hardship Affect Political Preferences? It Depends on the Political Context by Charlotte Cavaille and Anja Neundorf

2016-02: On the Social Appropriateness of Discrimination by Abigail Barr, Tom Lane and Daniele Nosenzo

2016-03: Existence and Indeterminacy of Markovian Equilibria in Dynamic Bargaining Games by Vincent Anesi and John Duggan. This paper has been published in Theoretical Economics, vol 12, issue 3. View here.

2016-04: Dynamic Bargaining and Stability with Veto Players by Vincent Anesi and John Duggan. This paper has been published in Games and Economic Behaviour vol 103. View here.

2016-05: Corruption and Bicameral Reforms by Giovanni Facchini and Cecilia Testa. This paper has been published in Social Choice and Welfare, vol 47, issue 2. View here.

2016-06: Manufacturing Extremism: Political Consequences of Profit-Seeking Media by Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay, Kalyan Chatterjee and Jaideep Roy

2016-07: Economic Recessions and Congressional Preferences for Redistribution by Maria Carreri and Edoardo Teso

2016-08: How Much Is That Star in the Window? Professorial Salaries and Research Performance in UK Universities by Gianni De Fraja, Giovanni Facchini and John Gathergood

2016-09: Elections and Divisiveness: Theory and Evidence by Elliott Ash, Massimo Morelli and Richard Van Weelden

2016-10: The Volatility of Volatility: Assessing Uses of the Pedersen Index to Measure Changes in Party Vote Shares by Fernando Casal Bértoa, Kevin Deegan-Krause and Tim Haughton. This paper has been published in Electoral Studies, vol 50. View here.

2016-11: Plaintive Plaintiffs: The First and Last Word in Debates by Elena D’Agostino and Daniel J Seidmann

2016-12: Glass half full? Or half empty? Civil service professionalization in the Western Balkans between successful rule adoption and ineffective implementation by Jan-Hinrik Meyer-Sahling

2016-13: Choosing Your Battles Wisely? Activist Preferences, Party Size and Issue Selection by Chitralekha Basu

2016-14: Labor Market Participation, Political Ideology and Distributive Preferences by Simona Demel, Abigail Barr, Luis Miller and Paloma Ubeda

2017-01: Race, Representation and Policy: Black Elected Officials and Public Spending in the US South by Andrea Bernini, Giovanni Facchini and Cecilia Testa

2017-02: The First and Last Word In Debates: Plaintive Plaintiffs by Elena D’Agostino and Daniel J Seidmann

2017-03: A Shut Mouth Catches No Flies: Consideration of Issues and Voting by Salvador Barberà and Anke Gerber

2017-04: The King Can Do No Wrong: On Criminal Immunity of Leaders by Jiahua Che, Kim-Sau Chung and Xue Qiao

2017-05: On the different forms of individual and group strategic behaviour, and their impact on efficiency by Salvador Barberà, Dolors Berga and Bernardo Moreno. This paper has been published in Studies in Systems, Decision and Control, vol 110.

2017-06: Tactical Extremism by Jon X. Eguia and Francesco Giovannoni

2018-01: The Clarity Incentive for Issue Engagements in Campaigns by Chitralekha Basu and Matthew Knowles

2018-02: Polarization and Corruption in America by Mickael Melki and Andrew Pickering

2018-03: The Electoral Impact of Newly Enfranchised Groups: The Case of Women’s Suffrage in the United States by Mona Morgan Collins

2018-04: Compliance shocks under low bureaucratic capacity by Daniel Tanis

2018-05: Policy Experimentation, Redistribution and Voting Rules by Vincent Anesi and T. Renee Bowen

2018-06: Dynamic Legislative Policy Making under Adverse Selection by Vincent Anesi

 

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